Increased heart rate as a physiological response to the SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine

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Countries such as the United Kingdom, Israel and the United States are now in the midst of a vaccine campaign against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As the vaccine is continued, there have been thousands of anecdotal reports of recipients suffering from symptoms of mild fatigue, pain and fever in the few days after dosing, to the point that citizens who do not suffer from these symptoms they care about the vaccine. It didn’t work for them.

Although widely publicized, evidence of physiological responses to vaccines is currently scarce in the published literature. Giogiro Quer and Matteo Gadaleta of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in California, USA, led an investigation to obtain follow-up data on physiological responses to vaccine programs.

Using a smartphone-based app that reported the physiological activities of smartwatches, Quer and Gadaleta found that resting heart rate increases after receiving a vaccine, especially those who received the Modern vaccine, which previously they had contracted COVID or were under 40 years old.

A pre-printed version of the research paper is available for reading in its entirety at medRxiv* server.

In the United States, two two-dose mRNA vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech & Moderna) and one single-dose vaccine (Janssen / Johnson & Johnson) are administered simultaneously to the general public. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 69% of the nearly 2 million individuals who received a second dose of mRNA vaccine reported some fever-like side effect on the days following, between 53.9% of these. it started only a day after receiving the puncture.

Mean confidence interval and 95% of absolute individual changes in resting heart rate (in BPM) from the individual baseline around the date of vaccination (day 0), for the first dose of vaccine (a) and for the second dose (b).  The cumulative distribution of the maximum variation in resting heart rate in the 2 days following vaccines after the first (c) and second (d) vaccine dose.

Mean confidence interval and 95% of absolute individual changes in resting heart rate (in BPM) from the individual baseline around the date of vaccination (day 0), for the first dose of vaccine (a) and for the second dose (b). The cumulative distribution of the maximum variation in resting heart rate in the 2 days following vaccines after the first (c) and second (d) vaccine dose.

The Quer and Gadaleta team collected data from more than 4,000 U.S. citizens using DETECT software, a smartphone app that syncs consensually with a user’s Fitbit or Apple watch device to record the heart rate, sleep patterns, and other physiological functions of a participant.

Participants were those who had received at least one dose of Pfizer or Moderna mRNA vaccines. The resting heart rate of all participants was recorded before receiving the dose, the day and the following days, and they were divided into three age groups: <40, 40-60 i> 60.

After adjusting for the confounding variables, the research team analyzed participants ’resting heart rate to infer physiological symptoms in the vaccines.

They found that resting heart rate increased in participants, perhaps up to an additional 1.5 beats per minute after receiving a dose. Mean heart rate, moreover, did not return to normal levels until four days after a primary jab and six days after a secondary jab.

Although no gender differences were observed, previous SARS-CoV-2 infection and participants ’ages affected heart rate. In fact, individuals in the group under 40 years of age had the most significant increase in heart rate and all those under 60 years of age experienced significantly higher heart rates than the group over 60 years of age after the second dose. Previous COVID infection was further associated with higher heart rates, albeit only after the first punch. Finally, the Modern vaccine was associated with higher rates of heart rate increase than the Pfizer vaccine and was similarly negatively correlated with age.

Normal activity and sleep patterns were altered slightly on the first night after the first dose, with researchers observing a significant decrease in activity and an increase in sleep. However, these returned to nominal levels the second day after vaccination.

This study provides complete and easily accessible evidence of subtle physiological symptoms of COVID mRNA vaccines: a slight increase in heart rate in the days following the dose, with a smaller increase in rest the next day. The authors are confident in their findings, though they warn that Fitbit and Apple watch technologies are demographically biased, with a strong bias toward younger users. In addition, the current deployment of vaccines in America has focused on the elderly and at risk rather than the general population.

However, this portable sensor technology has provided at least a glimpse into the effects of vaccines that could not be taken into account. It can allow for deeper future assessments of citizens in the future.

Important news

medRxiv publishes preliminary scientific reports that are not peer-reviewed and therefore should not be considered conclusive, guide clinical practice / health-related behavior, or treated as established information.



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